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THE EMPLOYMENT LAW GROUP®

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Do You Need a Maryland Harassment Lawyer?

  • Have you been the victim of unfair retaliation because you reported sexual harassment in your workplace?

  • Have you, yourself, been the subject of sexual harassment?
  • Do you fear coming into work because your supervisor or colleagues continually harass you?

In addition to federal prohibitions on sexual harassment, Maryland workers are also subject to the workplace harassment protections available under the Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act (“FEPA”). FEPA makes it unlawful for an employer with fifteen or more employees to discriminate or harass employees on the basis of their gender, age, race, or other protected attributes. FEPA also protects employees from retaliation when those employees disclose or object to practices that may constitute sexual harassment. If you have lost your position as a result of unlawful harassment or retaliation, FEPA may be able to help get your job back.

Learn More

Important statutes in this area of law:

  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act

    Prohibition against discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; prohibition against retaliation; enforcement by EEOC

  • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Protection against workplace discrimination; prohibition against retaliation; enforcement by EEOC

Notable TELG cases in this area of law:

  • Jackson v. Edgewood Management

    TELG client Donna Jackson won $650,000 in a case that extended “cat’s paw” liability to workplace retaliation cases filed under Maryland state law.

The attorneys at The Employment Law Group® law firm are experienced in representing Maryland employees in claims of sexual harassment, discrimination, and retaliation under the Fair Employment Practices Act and the federal anti-discrimination statutes. Whether our client’s goal is to resolve his or her claims quickly or proceed all the way through trial, we have helped numerous clients achieve favorable outcomes in their matters.

In Sterling v. Atlantic Automotive Corporation, we secured a $1,000,000 jury verdict for an employee whose supervisor repeatedly sexually harassed her. In Jackson v. Edgewood, The Employment Law Group® successfully represented a thirty year employee who was terminated for reporting her subordinate’s gender discrimination complaint. After proceeding through trial and the appeals process, Ms. Jackson saw the $650,000 jury verdict in her favor restored by an appellate judge in Maryland.

Under the Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act, aggrieved employees have six months from the date of an adverse action to file a claim with the Maryland Commission on Human Rights. Employees have 300 days to file a charge with the EEOC. But it is important that you do not delay in speaking to an attorney. You may have other claims with much shorter statutes of limitations and an undue delay may cause you to miss your filing deadline.

As with all legal claims, deadlines are crucial. Under the Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act, aggrieved employees have six months from the date of an adverse action to file a claim with the Maryland Commission on Human Rights. Employees have 300 days to file a charge with the EEOC. But it is important that you do not delay in speaking to an attorney. You may have other claims with much shorter statutes of limitations and an undue delay may cause you to miss your filing deadline.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
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What conduct is subject to workplace harassment protection?

Sexual harassment can take many forms and may include the following types of conduct:

  • Unwelcome sexual advances
  • Requests for sexual conduct or favors
  • Any physical or verbal conduct of a sexual nature that affects a worker’s employment

What Federal Law Prohibits Sexual Harassment in the Workplace?

Sexual harassment is against the law in Maryland is prohibited as a type of sexual discrimination by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and also by local Maryland laws. Title VII also prohibits workplace discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, and national origin. Title VII applies to employers with more than 15 employees.

Does Maryland Have State Laws Protecting Employees from Sexual Harassment?

The Maryland Fair Employment Practices Act, along with Article 49B of the Code of Maryland, make it illegal for employers from discriminating against employees based on the following protected statuses:

  • Race
  • Color
  • National Origin
  • Religion
  • Sex
  • Disability
  • Marital Status
  • Pregnancy
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Genetic Information

How Does Maryland Law Differ from Federal Anti-Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Law?

Maryland sexual harassment protections offer much broader protections than does federal law. For example:

  • In Maryland, individual supervisors may be held liable if they sexually harass their employees;
  • In Maryland, discrimination on the basis of an employee’s sexual orientation is explicitly against the law. Currently, federal employment law does not offer protection on the basis of sexual orientation.

How Can Victims of Sexual Harassment Be Compensated?

An employee who is found to have been the victim of sexual harassment in the workplace and may be entitled to:

  • Reinstatement to his or her former position,
  • A cease and desist order against the offending employer,
  • Lost wages and benefits,
  • Damages for possible emotional distress,
  • Fees and costs of legal representation,
  • Administrative fines against the employer,
  • Finally, federal law permits courts to order that an employer pay punitive damages.

Are Employees Protected from Termination or Other Forms of Retaliation When Reporting Sexual Harassment or Discrimination?

Yes. Employers are prohibited from taking any retaliatory actions an employee who reports or refuses to take part in what the employee reasonably believes to be illegal sexual harassment.

Illegal retaliation may include:

  • Firing or termination,
  • Suspension,
  • Demotion,
  • Denial of leave,
  • Reduction in salary,
  • Or any other action that may dissuade an employee from reporting sexual harassment

Learn More

Important statutes in this area of law:

  • Pregnancy Discrimination Act

    Prohibition against discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin; prohibition against retaliation; enforcement by EEOC

  • Civil Rights Act of 1964

    Protection against workplace discrimination; prohibition against retaliation; enforcement by EEOC

Notable TELG cases in this area of law:

  • Jackson v. Edgewood Management

    TELG client Donna Jackson won $650,000 in a case that extended “cat’s paw” liability to workplace retaliation cases filed under Maryland state law.

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